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Gardening Calendar

Explore the Vineyard District Gardening Calendar

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Click the blue links in the calendar to view individual calendar posts.

     
JANUARYSOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES
 
  • beets
  • carrots
  • kohlrabi
  • lettuce
  • spinach
  • English peas
  • pod peas
  • radish
  • beets
  • collards
  • lettuce
  • mustard greens
  • spinach
  • turnips
  • citrus
  • persimmons
  • broccoli
  • brussels sprouts
  • cabbage,
  • kale,
  • bulbing onions,
  • green onions
  • dill
  • fennel oregano
  • seedlings of parsley
Plant: Jan. 20-March 5; Sept. 10-Nov.15 Light: full sun to partial shade Water: average Soil needs: well-drained Fertilization: 2 weeks after planting; again when heads form; after harvesting heads
FEBRUARYSOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES 
 
  • beets
  • carrots
  • kale
  • lettuce
  • mustard greens
  • peas
  • spinach
  • turnips
  • tomatoes
  • peppers
  • arugula
  • beets
  • broccoli
  • cabbage
  • carrots
  • cauliflower
  • greens
  • lettuces
  • spinach
  • swiss chard
  • turnips
  • artichokes
  • asparagus crowns
  • asian greens
  • broccoli
  • cabbage
  • chard
  • collards
  • lettuce
  • mustard greens
  • onion sets
  • potatoes
  • shallot bulbs
  • chives
  • cilantro
  • dill
  • fennel
  • parsley
  • oregano
  • rosemary
  • thyme
  • potted fruit trees except citrus
Plant: Jan. 5–Feb. 20; Sept. 5-Oct. 25 Light: full sun to partial shade Water: average and is intolerant of soggy soil Soil needs: well-drained Fertilization: pre-planting or 2 weeks after thinning plants
MARCHSOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES 
 
  • beans
  • corn
  • english & sugar snap peas
  • beets
  • carrots
  • leafy greens
  • cabbage family
  • asparagus (first cuttings)
  • lettuce
  • mustard family leafy greens
  • cabbage family plants
  • peas
  • potatoes
  • carrots
  • beets
  • turnips
  • radishes
Insect problems start to increase along with warmer temperatures in March. Most of our insect problems can be controlled with relatively mild organic solutions – especially if caught early. Fungal issues will be popping up so keep a sharp eye out and be prepared to apply appropriate controls. Note that fungal control products generally only stop the spread of fungal diseases and don’t cure them so early detection and control are very important. For fruits and nuts it is often advisable to apply fungal controls routinely even in advance of signs of disease. Final applications of dormant or horticultural oil for scale insects on fruits and nuts will generally be complete by early this month.
APRILSOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES 
 
  • bush and pole beans
  • corn
  • okra
  • southern peas
  • cucumber
  • melons
  • okra
  • summer and winter squash
  • asparagus
  • artichokes
  • beets
  • broccoli
  • cauliflower
  • cabbage
  • carrots
  • radish
  • turnips
  • arugula
  • chard
  • collards
  • kale
  • lettuce
  • spinach
  • cilantro
  • dill
  • parsley
  • nasturtium
  • pansy
  • strawberries
  • eggplant
  • peppers
  • swiss chard
  • sweet potatoes
  • plant tomatoes before April 20-the sooner the better
  • basil
  • chives
  • lemongrass
  • oregano
  • rosemary
  • thyme
  • mint, with container growing recommended due to its aggressive growth
  • figs
  • pomegranates
  • citrus trees (after freezing is done)
Choose a growing site with good drainage, in full sun and thoroughly amend the soil with 4 or more inches of high quality compost.
MAYSOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES 
 
  • lima beans
  • black eyed peas
  • okra
  • pumpkin
  • summer squash
  • melon
  • cucumber
  • malabar
  • spinach
  • tomatillo
  • basil
  • potatoes
  • parsley
  • cucumber
  • eggplant
  • melons
  • okra
  • southern peas
  • pepper
  • sweet potato
  • pumpkin
  • radish
  • squash
  • tomato
Potatoes, the most popular vegetable in America is fun and easy to grow either in traditional gardens or in all sorts of large containers. Planted in February in central Texas gardens, they are most often ready to harvest in May. When the foliage turns yellow and dies, it is harvest time and the fun begins.
JUNESOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES 
 
  • lima beans
  • southern peas
  • okra
  • pumpkin
  • summer squash
  • winter squash
  • melon
  • carrots
  • corn
  • cucumbers
  • green beans
  • peppers
  • radishes
  • squash
  • tomatoes
  • turnips
  • blackberries
  • blueberries
  • figs
  • peaches
  • plums
  • melons
  • cucumber
  • eggplant
  • melons
  • okra
  • southern peas
  • pepper
  • pumpkin
  • squash
Harvest and eat vine ripened tomatoes immediately or refrigerate. And, since tomatoes are climacteric (continue to ripen after harvesting) to outsmart pesky birds, you can pick them in the pink stage and allow them to ripen indoors, unrefrigerated. Or if you’ve never had a fried, homegrown green tomato, maybe it’s time to give them a try.
JULYSOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES 
 
  • corn
  • cucumber
  • southern peas
  • okra
  • pumpkin
  • summer squash
  • winter squash
  • melon
  • corn
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • green beans
  • peppers
  • field peas
  • squash
  • tomatoes
  • corn
  • cucumber
  • eggplant
  • melon
  • okra
  • southern pea
  • pumpkin
  • squash
July is most often associated with watermelons in Texas, but for me it is also cantaloupes. And, has been since a 1976 visit to west Texas, when I was introduced to Pecos County cantaloupe, one of the most fragrant, sweet versions I’ve ever tasted. I learned that weather, water and soil make for perfect growing conditions in that part of Texas. Thereafter, some of those delicious melons came home with me from our annual July trip. Scientifically, we are talking muskmelon, but the terms are used interchangeably in this country. Growing on trailing vines, it is identified by its netted skin.
AUGUSTSOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES 
 
  • beans
  • corn
  • cucumber
  • mustard greens
  • turnips
  • summer and winter squash
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • okra
  • peppers
  • field peas
  • squash
  • melons
  • pears
  • grapes
  • bean
  • corn
  • garlic
  • pepper
  • squash
  • tomato
Eggplant can often be harvested in August. A relative of tomatoes, peppers and potatoes, it isn’t bothered by the hot weather and keeps producing into the fall. Europeans call it an aubergine, in reference to is deep, rich purple color.
SEPTEMBERSOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES 
 
  • peas
  • beets
  • carrots
  • collards
  • leaf lettuce
  • mustard greens
  • spinach
  • turnip
  • radish
  • eggplant
  • okra
  • peppers
  • squash
  • figs
  • pears
  • peanuts
  • pomegranate
  • beet
  • broccoli
  • brussel sprouts
  • cabbage
  • carrot
  • cauliflower
  • garlic
  • peas
  • radish
The cool season garden takes off in September, with the planting of many of the easily grown edibles, like the leafy greens. While thoughts most often turn to vegetable gardens in spring, hands down the fall-winter garden can be the most enjoyable. For one thing it is much more comfortable to be outdoors, also there are fewer plant pests and less watering yet plenty to harvest.
OCTOBERSOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES 
 
  • beets
  • carrots
  • collards
  • leaf lettuce
  • mustard greens
  • spinach
  • turnip
  • radish
  • arugula
  • cilantro
  • dill
  • parsley
  • cucumbers
  • eggplant
  • peppers
  • pumpkins
  • squash
  • sweet potatoes
  • pears
  • pecans
  • persimmons
  • pomegranates
  • beet
  • broccoli
  • brussel sprouts
  • cabbage
  • carrot
  • cauliflower
  • garlic
  • green onion
  • radish
Sweet potatoes are actually not potatoes at all and for that matter, they are not yams either. A member of the morning glory family – Ipomoea batatas – the sweet potato is an underground edible root with sweet, moist, orange flesh. Yams are dry, starchy, white tubers not even related to sweet potatoes. The Irish potato is actually an underground stem or tuber.
NOVEMBERSOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES 
 
  • arugula
  • carrots
  • leaf lettuce
  • mustard greens
  • turnip
  • radish
  • green beans
  • peppers
  • pumpkins
  • squash
  • sweet potatoes
  • tomatoes
  • tomatillo
  • winter squash
  • pears
  • pecans
  • persimmons
  • pomegranates
  • broccoli
  • cabbage
  • carrot
  • radish
Cool season crops are growing in earnest this month, but there is still time to add a few more things to the vegetable garden. Keep a close eye on weather predications and be ready to cover new or baby plants in the event of a freeze. Use lightweight blankets, a cardboard box or frost cloth that is made specifically for this purpose.
DECEMBERSOWHARVESTPLANTNOTES 
 
  • carrots
  • lettuce
  • beets
  • collards
  • lettuce
  • mustard greens
  • spinach
  • turnips
  • citrus
  • pecans
  • persimmons
  • brussel sprouts
  • fruit trees (bare root after dormancy)
With minimal planting and harvesting tasks, the month of December offers the home gardener respite. It is an opportune time to reflect on your garden’s production or research new growing opportunities. Don’t forget to keep a close eye on weather predications and be ready to protect plants in the event of a freeze.
    
     

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